Honors College
Oak View Hall, Room 210
509 Meadow Brook Road
Rochester, MI 48309-4452
(map)
(248) 370-4450
Fax: (248) 370-4479

HC Courses

HC Courses

We invite creative, informative, and exciting course proposals from all Oakland University faculty interested in teaching in The Honors College. Honors College courses are offered in the following general education areas:
  • Literature
  • The Arts
  • The Social Sciences
  • Western Civilization
  • Formal Reasoning
  • Natural Science and Technology
  • Global Perspective
Honors College courses fulfill HC students’ general education requirements for the areas listed above. HC classes are capped at 20 students and are intended to be interactive and innovative. Each course we offer is reviewed and accepted by the Honors College Director.

Examples of past Honors College courses:
  • The Art of Slavery
  • Spiral Dynamics and the Theory of Everything
  • Hip Hop and Urban Environments
  • The Making of the Atomic Bomb
  • The Photographic Text: Reading and Writing the Photographic Image 
  • Understanding the Human Animal Bond
  • Too Kind: The Science Behind Pathological Altruism
Summer 2017
HC 204 -Innovation and Archaeology

Instructor: Susan Lynne Beckwith
Course Time: TR 1:00-4:20 pm
General Education: Western Civilization & *Writing Intensive
Term: Summer 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:
In today’s world, innovation is continuously sought and emphasized, whether it be in the sciences, business, the arts, or industry. At the same time, the way we live our lives is often such that we go about our daily business simply accepting, sometimes not even noticing, the objects and spaces around us. The structure of the rooms we inhabit—our kitchens, our classroom, and our conference rooms—seem ‘natural’ to us in their basic layout and ‘content’ due to their very familiarity. We assume they are that way because it’s the way they've always been, and thus, the way they always should be. Yet the inspiration for innovation arises from questioning how things could be done or could be made ‘better’—and this requires critical inquiry into not just what a space or object is, but also why it was originally created and what influenced its design.


HC 204 -The Tudors of England
Instructor: Randall Engle
Course Time: MWF 12:00-1:07 pm
General Education: *Western Civilization
Term: Summer 2017

*This course meets off campus for 2 weeks in England's Imperial College

Course Description:
Students will study how England wrestled with changing ideas about power in religion, government, economics and society.  Also, we will study how the turbulent thirst for power in these fields engaged peoples' minds and souls. Students will examine how England's modern political system is ultimately based on Tudor models, and how the Elizabethan religious settlement shaped the relationship between religion and the state in England today.


HC 390 - Introduction to the Thesis

Instructor: Graeme Harper
Course Time: Online
Term: Summer 2016

**Should be taken the year before you plan to graduate
**Requires departmental approval (contact hcadvising@oakland.edu)


Course Description:
The HC 390 course aims to see you complete a strong, original proposal for your Honors College senior project, a proposal that, at then end of the course, can then be presented to the Honors College Council for review. Before taking this course, you must have communicated with a potential mentor and have a topic idea. During this course you will: Write a proposal outline, including a brief description of current work in the field or area in which you have interest Establish a set of aims and objectives that you will pursue in your project Explore the kinds of outcome(s) that you expect to achieve Produce an initial list (or bibliography) of things you might draw upon to complete your project Think about how this project might assist you in your future work or study And request thesis/project funding, if needed The purpose of HC390 is to complete your senior project proposal. One that you are excited about, and intend researching in your senior year. **Although this course is largely online there will be 1-2 mandatory class sessions: an Introductory session and a face to face appointment with an instructor.

Fall 2017
HC 1000 -Making Discoveries
Instructor: Graeme Harper
Course Time: TBD
Term: Fall 2017


Course Description:
HC 100 is a 4 credit Honors College freshmen course exploring the exciting nature of human discovery, whether in the sciences, social sciences or in the arts, whether by individuals or by groups. It is also a course in which you will explore your own ambitions, your own potential discoveries. Making Discoveries will look to the wider world, to the community and to industry for models of the opportunities that the world offers. We will also look at the things that have been (and are) discovered in and around a college or university (like this one!).
The course will encourage creative thinking, as well as active critical engagement. It will look at what we can do individually as well as what we can do in teams or groups, and it aims to provide you with those higher order skills that will actively build on your potential for success, no matter what your planned major or interest.

HC 2010 -Hallelujah! Handel's Music
Instructor:  Randall Engle
Course Time:MWF 12:00-1:07 pm
General Education: Arts
Term: Fall 2017


Course Description:
Hallelujah! The Music of Handel. The music of most Baroque composers fell out of fashion soon after their deaths; but Handel remained continuously—and in England, increasingly—popular throughout the centuries. What about his music is so universally appealing and enduring? This course will explore all things Handelian (his story, his music, his context) and then focus specifically on his magnum opus Messiah. The course will include lectures, short papers, class presentations, and attendance at a live performance of Messiah at Orchestra Hall and a post-concert reception with the artists.

HC 2010 -Social Difference on the Stage
Instructor: Gania Barlow
Course Time: MW 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education: Arts, U.S.Diversity and Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description:

Far from being just a form of elite, highbrow entertainment, theater has long offered communities a means of working through major social tensions. Dramatizing social problems can air repressed feelings and ideas, create emotional catharsis for viewers, and imagine the way toward possible solutions. This course will explore a variety of ways social difference has been addressed on the stage, from classical Greek drama to contemporary theater. As we explore how a diverse variety of playwrights throughout history have dramatized issues of race, gender, religious difference, and so on, we will build a rich understanding of how theater can be a productive force for community building and understanding in the face of social difference and division. Assignments will include critical and creative responses, as well as going to see at least one play during the course of the semester.
HC 2010 -The Art & Science of Emotions
Instructor: Susan Lynne Beckwith
Course Time: MWF 12:00-1:07 pm
General Education: Arts and Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description:

The word ‘emotion’ did not even exist as we know it today until the early 17th century. Prior to that point in time, it referred to either “civil [or political] unrest” or movement (literally, a motion, a migration). In 1602, it comes to mean an “agitation of the mind” or “strong feelings, passion; …instinctive feeling as distinguished from reasoning or knowledge.” In this class we will attempt to join ‘reasoning and knowledge’ (the science and philosophy of an emotion) to the general understanding and myriad representations of emotions. During the semester, we will devote blocks of study to a series of specific emotions: first studying the physical science, philosophy, and theory of that emotion before moving on to reading literary works (novels/short stories, poems) and analyzing lyrics, visual artworks, music, and films that attempt not only to depict but to also ‘move’ the reader/viewer to feel that same emotion.
HC 2020 -Banned Books
Instructor: Rebecca Mercado Jones
Course Time: M/W/F 9:20-10:27 am
General Education: Literature,Writing Intensive and U.S. Diversity
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description:

The Banned Books Class takes seriously the charge of the American Library Association's Office of Intellectual Freedom's (OIF) mission to educate students about the "nature and importance of intellectual freedom." In this class we will read seven books which frequently appear on the OIF's banned and challenged books list, explore and analyze the social discourses surrounding each book, and challenge students to engage in and the rhetoric of book censorship. This course will challenge you to read, think, and get uncomfortable, and then write about it.
HC 2020 -Here There be Monsters
Instructor: Gania Barlow
Course Time: MWF 1:20-2:27 pm
General Education: Literature & *Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description: Monsters tend to be some of the most memorable figures in literature. They come in all shapes and sizes, from beyond our world and from within; some are born, some are made, some are only "monsters" in the eye of the beholder. In this course we will bravely encounter a range of famous literary monsters—from ancient myths to contemporary fiction and film. We will assess what monsters mean and do in particular narratives, as well as what ideas of "monstrosity" mean and do across different times and cultures. Assignments will include in-class presentations, short weekly responses, and more formal papers, including a final research essay. Students will come away from the course not only with a rich knowledge of famous literary monsters, but also having developed the transferable critical tool of "monster theory," which can be used to analyze a wide variety of literary and cultural forms..

HC 2020 - Heroes: Who's Your Yoda?
Instructor:Mary Wermuth
Course Time:M/W/F 8:00-9:47 am
General Education: Literature & *Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description:
This course looks at one of the most misunderstood aspects of our literature.Whether discussing Greek Gods, cowboys, futuristic sci fi characters, or ordinary people, students rarely have a concrete definition and understanding of the main character/hero. This coure will present the opportunity to develop a meaningful definition of hero and to analyze the qualities of different types of heroes in literature and life-novels, short plays, movies, short stories, myths, comics and more. From the readings, films and discussions students can discern whether characters and real people support their new found qualities of a hero

HC 2020 - Letters and Correspondence
Instructor: Doris Plantus
Course Time:T/R 10:00-11:47 am
General Education: Literature
Term: Fall 2017


Course Description:: In the age of email and texting as a dominant form of communication between people, this course explores a time when hand-written letters and correspondence, without the luxury of copy and paste, spell and grammar check, or unique abbreviations and emojis, expressed thoughts and feelings with art and discipline. Drawing on examples of ancient letters, such as those by St. Paul, Pliny to Emperor Trajan, Heloise and Abelard, Einstein and Mileva, the American Civil War, and others, we will study the characters, times, conflicts, events, and cultures that produced these intimate expressions. In so doing, we will investigate and contemplate the thoughts and feelings that reveal private histories of real people and their need to communicate publicly and privately.

HC 2020-The Memory Place

Instructor: Craig Smith
Course Time: T/R 1:00-2:47  pm
General Education: Literature, *Writing Intensive  and U.S. Diversity
Term:Winter 2018
** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:Ancient philosophers conceived of human memory as a palace, its rooms built from the experiences and learning of the individual. Creative writers and critics have always been preoccupied with the connections and disconnections between language and memory. Sigmund Freud conceived of recovered spoken memory as the very center of identity in The Wolfman; Virginia Woolf put this theory to practice as a literary artist in Moments of Being; and the great African-American writer Audre Lorde used personal and collective memory to speak truth to power in Zami. We will find a city constructed of memory in Jan Morris’s Trieste>/i>, and visually reconstructed memory in Alison Bechdel’s graphic novel Fun Home. On film, we will encounter unreliable memory in Rashomon, a character made up of memory in Vagabond, and the nightmare of vanishing memory in Memento. Assignments include creative and critical research projects. Class meetings will balance lectures with small-group discussions.

HC 2040 - How is Knowledge Created?
Instructor: Roberta Michel
Course Time:T/R 1:00-2:47 am
General Education: Western Civilization & *Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017


* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement


Course Description:
Where does knowledge come from? How is Knowledge constructed? This class explores various theories of knowledge that exist. We will examine how knowledge is built up and evaluated by individuals and societies; as well as look at how we learn and make the connection between academic disciplines and our personal thoughts, feelings, and actions. We will explore and recognize the way in which culture and societal positions filter the way in which we see and interact with the world. We will look at key thinkers and examine how they have influenced and framed current ways of thinking as well as how the various disciplines of knowledge influences thought. Lastly the question that we will introduce in the course is: How are you prepared to think and frame the future?

HC 2040 - Latin-Dead or Alive?
Instructor: Carolyn Delia
Course Time:M 6:30-9:50 pm
General Education: Western Civilization & *Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017

* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:
This Latin course emphasizes the prominence of Latin as a basis for a large percentage of the English language. The course focuses on Latin derivatives used in the professions/careers that interest students and provides them with cognitive connections among seemingly varied and specialized terms. Students will explore the impact that Latin has on making sense of every day communication in this “do it yourself” world. The cultural portion of the course introduces the student to a concept of “Romans Everywhere” and they begin to notice state/flag mottos, slogans, and inscriptions. Learning of the Roman contributions to law, government, architecture, etc., contributes to a student’s feelings of global heritage and connections and make antiquity a part of their personal ancestry.

HC 2040- Religious Conflict in the West
Instructor: Ian Greenspan
Course Time:M/W/F 4:00-5:07 pm
General Education: Western Civilization & *Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017

* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:
This course is a historical consideration of the events, conditions, understandings, and ideologies that have given rise to religious conflict, persecution, violence, and hate from the ancient period to the modern era. We will focus primarily on the inter- and intra-faith tensions of Christianity, Islam and Judaism. Specific topics will include: conceptions of evil/the demonic, ancient near Eastern cosmologies, the Hebrew prophetic tradition, Christian crusades, inquisition and reformation, early modern blood libel, European secularism and faith in the “long” nineteenth century, religious and cultural nativism in nineteenth-century U.S., Nazi religious understandings, twentieth-century American ideologies of hate, and modern western religious extremism/violence.

HC 2050- Will the European Union Survive?
Instructor: Frank Cardimen
Course Time:T/R 10:00-11:47 am
General Education: Global Perspective
Term: Fall 2017

Course Description:Will the EU survive now that the UK has exited? Comprehensive evaluation of the European Union and the Euro from its inception to today. Evaluate how the EU functions and what are the significant difficulties the EU has to manage the future with their unique monetary economic model. Learn about fiscal vs. monetary policy and how this economic issue confounds the efforts of the EU. After 4 weeks of classroom research about the EU, the countries traveling, and the business contacts to be visited, travel students will visit France, Belgium, and UK for 11 days to learn from business, EU Parliament and others about the conditions affecting the EU today and into the future. Experience cultural, language, political, currency, and history traveling to better understand the reasons for and the difficulties with the current EU model. Final group project will be whether the EU will survive in the next 5 years?

HC 2060- Leadership: The Challenge
Instructor: Roberta Michel
Course Time:T/R 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education: Social Science, Writing Intensive and Knowledge Applications Integration
Term: Fall 2017

* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

** Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the Social Science knowledge exploration area

Course Description:
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of effective leadership. Students will investigate leadership concepts and theories; as well as gain an overview of personal leadership assessments. Students will put together their own leadership development plans. Students will be expected to be involved in some on or off campus activity where they will be expected to apply their learning.

HC 2060- War and Peace
Instructor: Gottfried Brieger
Course Time:T 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education: Social Science and Writing Intensive
Term: Fall 2017

* Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:
We hear a great deal about war but peace seems to be primarily a rhetorical term for the absence of open conflict. Much of history, as commonly taught, deals with war. Pacifism has a long and honorable history as well however, and we will explore it. We will also examine the behavioral instincts which are called upon to maintain the culture of war. Having experienced the consequences of (WW II) as a child, I will be able to relate first hand to the deplorable results. Students will be encouraged to examine their own attitudes toward these issues, and to augment their understanding of the current world situation.
The course format will consist of lectures, discussions, short documentaries, short presentations and two research term papers.

HC 2070-Machine Super-intelligence
Instructor: Daniel Steffy
Course Time:M/W 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education: Formal Reasoning
Term: Fall 2017

Course Description:

The question of how to build machines that mimic or exhibit human-like intelligence has been around since the beginning of the computing age. Modern computers cannot only beat humans at games like Chess but also perform tasks once thought impossible like driving a car or diagnosing medical problems. In this course we will study the field of artificial intelligence, from its early roots to the modern age.
HC 3900- Introduction to the Thesis
Instructor: Graeme Harper
Course Time:online
Term: Fall 2017
*Should be taken the year before you plan to graduate
**Requires departmental approval to register (contact hcadvising@oakland.edu)


Course Description:

The HC 3900 course aims to see you complete a strong, original proposal for your Honors College senior project, a proposal that, at then end of the course, can then be presented to the Honors College Council for review. Before taking this course, you must have confirmed a mentor and have a topic idea.
During this course you will:
  • Write a proposal outline, including a brief description of current work in the field or area in which you have interest
  • Establish a set of aims and objectives that you will pursue in your project
  • Explore the kinds of outcome(s) that you expect to achieve
  • Produce an initial list (or bibliography) of things you might draw upon to complete your project
  • Think about how this project might assist you in your future work or study And request thesis/project funding, if needed
The purpose of HC390 is to complete your senior project proposal. One that you are excited about, and intend researching in your senior year.


*Although this course is largely online there will be 1-2 mandatory class sessions: an Introductory session and a face to face appointment with an instructor.

Winter 2018
HC 2010- Art of the Masters, Greatest?
Instructor:Paul Kohler
Course Time: W 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education: Arts 
Term: Winter 2018


Course Description:
Throughout the world history of Art there has always been one or more individuals who set the standard and led to the innovation of new thought, philosophy and vision of art style. These individuals have become known as the Great Art Masters of Western Civilization. Students will learn about these Masters and formulate an opinion of each one’s contribution.


HC 2010 -Byzantine Iconography
Instructor:Doris Plantus
Course Time: MW 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education:Arts
Term:Winter 2018


Course Description:
The “writing” of icons, or two dimensional paintings Of religious themes is a 2000-year old tradition in Byzantine religious art, reflecting specific methods unique to Eastern Orthodoxy, and not adequately addressed in Western Art surveys. This course will explore the origins and sustained artistic traditions of iconography, with attention to style such as Russian and Byzantine, materials, and symbolism that provide the religious narrative. Icons are venerated for their hagiographic significance, which captures visually important Moments in the lives of saints and religious figures, such as Jesus. In addition to studying individual icons,, we will also Study “painted” churches and monasteries, which include internal and external frescos dating back centuries.


HC 2010-Creative Adaptation
Instructor:Gania Barlow
Course Time: MW 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education:Arts
Term:Winter 2018


Course Description:
The idea that "there is nothing new under the sun" is as old as the Biblical book of Ecclesiastes. But what do writers and artists gain from retelling or reimagining older characters and stories? In this course we will explore answers to that question by examining traditions of creative adaptation, reading "original" works alongside literary, visual, musical, and performance-based adaptations of them. The course will be divided into units that each focus on one central case study of a narrative that is widely adapted, building connections across artistic media as well as across temporal, cultural, racial, and gender lines. Through such diverse, multimedia clusters we will analyze the creative and interpretive work that goes into such adaptations, and how later artists find ways to explore their own identities and cultures through engagement with older works. Assignments will include both creative and critical responses to course materials.


HC 2010-Opera and Drama
Instructor:David Kidger
Course Time: T/R 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education:Arts
Term:Winter 2018


Course Description:
The course explores opera as an artistic form of musical, political, economic and social expression, starting with Monterverdi’s “L’Orfeo,” composed for the northern Italian court in Mantua in 1607, and finishing with Richard Strauss’ “Salome,” based on Oscar Wilde’s 1891 play, and composed for Dresden in 1905. The history of opera is not just about singers and arias, choruses and elaborate stage effects (though these have always been very important to the tradition). Opera itself is inherently political, providing social commentary on its time and its audience, and providing a window to how opera could shape an artistic view of past, present and future events. Reading music is helpful, however, it is not a requirement in any sense for this course. Students will learn critical listening skills as they watch and listen to performances, taking their individual experiences and collaborating in class, and in individual written responses.


HC 2010-Seduction in German Cinema
Instructor: Doris Plantus
Course Time: M 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education:Arts
Term:Winter 2018


Course Description:
This course examines a wide selection of films from the history of German cinema with an eye to the techniques that overcome language and culture, in favor of seductive visual narrative styles. Not only are we viewers in public and private spaces, we are also likely non-German speakers often contesting with subtitles (translation), thus more vulnerable to the seduction of film technique.  Our task will be to develop an art of seeing film as opposed to watching a movie, and a context for analysis that includes attention to the adaptation and translation processes that inform the way the film is made, and the way we see it. Beginning with the Weimar period of Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922), earliest surviving adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, and similar expressionist film makers such as von Sternberg and the controversial Riefenstahl, then jumping to New German Cinema of Herzog and Fassbinder, and concluding with works by Wenders and Haneke, we will confront each film’s means of seduction in the context of the social conditions in which the films were made, having in view the adaptations as in the case of Stoker’s Dracula, and Heinrich Mann’s Professor Unrat (1905) as the basis of von Sternberg’s iconic Blue Angel (1930).



HC 2020- From Aesop to Zootopia

Instructor:Craig Smith
Course Time: T/R 1:00-2:47 pm
General Education:Literature and Writing Intensive
Term:Winter 2018
** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:
Some of the most ancient surviving literature, fables from Egypt, Greece, India and China, uses animal characters to explore human nature. This practice of representing non-human beings in human terms—called anthropomorphism—remains one of the most popular and familiar of literary devices today, among readers of all ages and cultures. It is alive in genres ranging from picture books to experimental novels. This course will look at the ways that animal characters have been represented in classic and contemporary literature and film, and the approaches that modern critics have taken to understand the artistic and ethical implications of this literature—a scholarly discussion that has crossed over into the scientific community in recent years. Assignments will include opportunities for creative and critical research projects. Class meetings will balance lecture with small-group discussion.



HC 2020- Literature Goes to Hell

Instructor:Gania Barlow
Course Time:M/W/F 1:20-2:27 pm
General Education: Literature & *Writing Intensive 
Term:Winter 2018
** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:Throughout literary history, Hell has served as both a persistent setting and a thematic fixation for writers. Hell is a place of punishment and pain; it threatens us by holding up a mirror to the worst in ourselves. But the literature of hell also offers its readers a second chance to right the wrongs in our communities and our souls. So is Hell in literature a place of horror or of hope? Tragedy or justice? Chaos or divine order? This course will examine a variety of literary depictions of Hell, exploring some very different visions of Hell--hot and cold, full and empty, spectacular and mundane--and the variety of religious and secular uses to which ideas of Hell have been put across a range of cultures and times. Assignments will include critical analysis, group presentations, and a final creative or research project.



HC 2020- Modern Chinese Short Stories

Instructor: Yun Anoop
Course Time:T/R 3:30-5:17 pm
General Education: Literature & *Writing Intensive 
Term:Winter 2017
** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:This course introduces students to selected translations of Western fiction in early modern China, a time when the initial concept of translation was developing and the passion for introducing literary masterpieces to Chinese readers was unprecedented. Most of the literary translations at that time do not meet today’s standard; errors and modifications occurred commonly. Through studying a few cases—including but not limited to Lin Shu’s “translation” of the French novel The Lady of the Camellias—students will learn how early modern Chinese translators made their decisions and discuss what problems a translator can encounter. For example, is loyalty to the original texts the main goal of translation? How to achieve that? In what situations can/may it be compromised? Through the course, students will know the literary context of early Modern China and learn a few key concepts in translation studies. No knowledge of Chinese is required for this course.



HC 2020-Shakespeare's Tragedies

Instructor: Susan Feigenson
Course Time: T/R 10:00-11:47  pm
General Education: Literature, *Writing Intensive  and U.S. Diversity
Term:Winter 2018
** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:Each of Shakespeare’s four great tragedies breaks bonds: social, familial, political, and cultural. Hamlet severs bonds between brothers, Macbeth destroys bonds between guest and host, king and subject, Othello nullifies the union of husband and wife, and King Lear invalidates bonds both between siblings and between father and daughters. We will examine these magnificent plays primarily through this lens, reading seminal essays as well as looking at classic productions of stage and movie adaptions to see how different societies and times reflect these plays in their own light.



HC 2040- Edwardian England

Instructor: Randall Engle
Course Time:M/W/F 12:00-1:07 pm
General Education: Western Civilzation
Term:Winter 2017

Course Description:The World of Edwardian England. The PBS series “Downton Abbey” (re)introduced the world to Edwardian England. At the turn of the century, with a new king on the throne, England witnessed some of the most sweeping, dramatic changes known to modern history: suffrage, crumbling socio-economic barriers, radical changes in fashion, new scientific claims, and a world forever changed by war. This course will explore not only how the world changed in Edwardian Britain, but also how America was shaped by it. This course studies the social systems, monarchy and the Church of England of that time—in addition to the foods, the fashion and the music. Evaluation will be class participation, readings, and an individual project that will be offered as a class presentation. The class will be offered at Meadowbrook Estate, Oakland's own "Downton Abbey."




HC 2040- Spirits, Gods & Aliens

Instructor:Benjamin Bennett-Carpenter
Course Time:T/R 8:00-9:47 am
General Education: Western Civilizathon, Writing Intensive, and U.S. Diversity
Term:Winter 2018


** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:How do we explain people’s reported experiences of spirits, gods, or aliens? That is the central question of this course. "Spirits, Gods, & Aliens: Interdisciplinary Studies from the Arts & Sciences" explores possible explanations for people’s self-reported experiences of these apparently mysterious phenomena. Students are introduced to the development of disciplinary and interdisciplinary views on experiences of supernatural or paranormal agents as human and natural phenomena, particularly as those experiences have evolved prior to and within Western civilization, with a focus on 20th to early 21st century American religion and culture. Texts include Repko, Szostak, & Buchberger's Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies (SAGE, 2014); Bader, Baker, & Mencken’s Paranormal America: Ghost Encounters, UFO Sightings, Bigfoot Hunts, and Other Curiosities in Religion and Culture (NYU, 2nd ed., 2017), and Boyer's Religion Explained: The Evolutionary Origins of Religious Thought (2001), among other select texts and films/videos.



HC 2050- Asian Pop Culture & Globalization

Instructor:Chiaoning Su
Course Time: T 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education: Global Perspective and *Writing Intensive
Term:Winter 2017

** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:This course explores East Asian popular culture, ranging from cinema, television, music, comic art and video games, and their global impact on political and consumer consciousness. This course will first discuss the main theoretical approaches of cultural globalization to understand its promise of cultural hybridization and its threat of cultural homogenization. It will also examine the radical transformation in pop culture production and distribution led by globalized social networking and digital delivery systems. This course will further explore the way media ownership, cultural values, political systems, and technological innovation shape multiple culture industries in the East Asian context (i.e., Japan, South Korea, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) and trace their sociopolitical, aesthetic, and affective impact at the local, regional and global level.



HC 2060- Resistance and Representation

Instructor:Susan Beckwith
Course Time: R 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education:Social Science & Writing Intensive
Term:Winter 2018


** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:Welcome to the Fun-house! (Or possibly the Mad-House!) Nabokov’s novel, Pale Fire, is a text purposefully written to resist a singular interpretation: and in doing so the author critiques the academy (us—universities, departments, professors, and students) that attempt to come to definitive conclusions on anything, even the act of analysis itself…. By analyzing this text, students will discover the failures, the flaws, and the ultimate futility of singular interpretations in any analysis—which will further their ability and agility in performing analyses in all areas. And this text itself is agile: with its myriad possible ‘authors,’ its designated parts (Prologue, Poem, Footnotes, etc.) which refuse hierarchical categorization, and the fact that is has even more than one murder suspect… or maybe no murder at all! And, the icing on this multi-layered cake, is that Nabokov manages to accomplish all of this with a delectable dose of humor.



HC 2060-Russian Food Culture in America

Instructor:Carol Hart
Course Time: W 5:00-8:20 pm
General Education:Social Science & Writing Intensive
Term:Winter 2018


** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:Food serves as a key component of ethnic and national identity. This course examines the food culture of Russia (with some forays into the neighboring cuisines of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) through the portals of literature, film, art, and popular culture. Using a variety of texts and the methodologies of food history and cultural analysis, students will research, write and speak about food and food culture, and the perspective they give on the human experience in Russia, in particular the Soviet and post-Soviet eras. Critical writing assignments will explore the relationship between food and culture. Field trips to Russian and Polish restaurants and markets will give the class hands-on experiences with consuming Russian and Polish food. The role that food and food production play in the nation's economy and foreign relations will also be considered.



HC 2070-Logic: It's Just so Logical

Instructor: Carolyn Delia
Course Time: MWF 1:20-2:27 pm
General Education: Formal Reasoning & Writing Intensive
Term:Winter 2018


** Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement

Course Description:This is a non-mathematical based introduction to formal logic which attempts to show that being “logical” is immensely important but only achieved through definite thinking patterns. The course presents the types of logical reasoning, forms, rules, and practical application of argument formation and evaluation. The text will provide the knowledge base but the exercises and projects will come from various disciplines/careers and include various types of logical reasoning from logic puzzles and exam problems to critical reading and argument formation. Various fallacies will be explored. Students will be able to recognize the validity of arguments they encounter in their course work, career work, advertisements and product/services offers. Students will become more proficient at formulating arguments for use in their courses, persuasive presentations or writings, and negotiations or proposals each student may create as an individual with a personal life and professional career.



HC 2080-Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science

Instructor: Fritz McDonald
Course Time: T/R 10:00-11:47 pm
General Education: Natural Science
Term:Winter 2018

Course Description:Is the mind a computer program? 20th century scientists developed the computational theory of the mind, a theory that holds that the mind is itself a computer program. Artificial intelligence has made major strides in recent decades, with more and more sophisticated machines simulating certain kinds of human thought and activity. The question remains: can a computer really think? We will consider research in computer science, psychology, linguistics, and philosophy to help answer this and other questions regarding artificial intelligence. Our main focus will be cognitive architecture: if the mind really is a computer program, what type of program is it? How does it work?


HC 3900- Introduction to the Thesis

Instructor: Graeme Harper
Course Time: online
Term:Winter 2018
*Should be taken the year before you plan to graduate
**Requires departmental approval to register(contact hcadvising@oakland.edu)
***Before taking this course, you must have confirmed a mentor and have a topic idea.


Course Description:

The HC390 course aims to see you complete a strong, original proposal for your Honors College senior project, a proposal that, at then end of the course, can then be presented to the Honors College Council for review. Before taking this course, you must have confirmed a mentor and have a topic idea.
During this course you will:

  • Write a proposal outline, including a brief description of current work in the field or area in which you have interest
  • Establish a set of aims and objectives that you will pursue in your project
  • Explore the kinds of outcome(s) that you expect to achieve
  • Produce an initial list (or bibliography) of things you might draw upon to complete your project
  • Think about how this project might assist you in your future work or study And request thesis/project funding, if needed

The purpose of HC390 is to complete your senior project proposal. One that you are excited about, and intend researching in your senior year.


*Although this course is largely online there will be 1-2 mandatory class sessions: an Introductory session and a face to face appointment with an instructor.

Courses in the Major

Honors College ‘in major” Advanced Scholarship Courses

New Option to Satisfy HC requirements:

HC students may choose to take up to 2 (4 credit) "Advanced Scholarship" courses in their major in place of one HC Gen Ed. 

Option A. If a Honors College student is advised to stay more within their major, they take:

  • 2 advanced scholarship /in major courses
  • 2 HC Gen Ed courses

*Plus the language, thesis, and service requirements

Option B. If an Honors College student is best advised to take more HC Gen Eds, they can choose no Advanced Scholarship courses in their major.

  • They simply take 3 HC Gen Eds.

*Plus the language, thesis, and service requirement.

  • Advanced Scholarship courses are considered reasonably advanced work in a particular discipline.
  • Students are advised to consult an Honors College adviser before making any selection of  “in major” courses.


CURRENT list of “in major” Advanced Scholarship choices (courses will be added as they become available)

Anthropology

AN 395 - The Human Skeleton in Social Science [CRN 44702]

Biology

BIO 417 - Molecular Biology
BIO 419 - Advanced Genetics
BIO 421 - Medical Microbiology
BIO 423 – Immunology
BIO 427 -Cell Biology of Cancer
BIO 443 - Functional Genomics and Bioinformatics
BIO 465 - Medical Parasitology
BIO 471 - Stream Ecology
BIO 482 - Topics in Evolutionary Biology
BIO 483 - Topics in Community and Population Biology
BIO 493 - Integrative Pharmacology
BIO 495 – Scientific Inquiry and Communication
BIO 499 - Integrative Biomedicine and Disease

Chemistry

CHM or BCM 490

Communication/Journalism

COM 303 - Theories of Communication.
COM 385 - Multicultural Communication.
COM 350 - Popular Media in the Age of Convergence.
JRN 329 - Digital Storytelling for the Media: Diversity, Identity, and Community.

Education and Human Services

Our 4000 level classes in the Elementary Education program include:
EED 4230 Teaching Mathematics
EED 4260 Teaching Science
EED 4270 Teaching Social Studies
EED 4950 Student Teaching
RDG 4214 Reading Appraisal
SE 4401 Students with Special Needs

Our 4000 level classes in the Human Resource Development program include:
HRD 4300 Instructional Methods
HRD 4200 Change Process and Org. Analysis
HRD 4950 Internship

Our elective 4000 classes in HRD include
HRD 4320, 4700, 4510, 4600, 4100, 4410, 4430, 4420, 4440


Engineering & Computer Science

ME 490
ISE 490
ECE 490, or
CSE 490 AlsoISE 495 ST: Competing in a Connected World, CRN 43112, from 2015 fall semester

Health Sciences

HS 423
HS 405

Music

MUS 331
MUS 332

Nursing

NRS 304: Human Sexuality

Physics

Phys 490

Psychology

Psy 302 - Evolutionary psychology
Psy 302 - Science and Superstition